Proposed Pedestrian Scramble Crossing Trial at Canada / Ingram

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Council and Staff are currently exploring other alternatives to the Scramble Crossing at the Canada Avenue and Ingram Street. This page will be updated if/when an alternate option is approved.




The City of Duncan is implementing a trial Pedestrian Scramble Crossing at the intersection of Canada Avenue and Ingram Street. A Pedestrian Scramble Crossing, also known as a Diagonal Crossing or X-Crossing, is a type of traffic signal movement that temporarily stops all vehicle traffic, from all directions, allowing pedestrians to cross an intersection in every direction, including diagonally, during a dedicated phase that is for pedestrians only. This initiative is being taken to increase pedestrian safety at the Canada / Ingram intersection.


The Canada / Ingram Pedestrian Scramble Crossing project will begin as a trial program to determine the viability and community reaction to the project. The trial will see partial road markings installed in the intersection and slight adjustments to the signal timings to accommodate the all-directions pedestrian crossings. All of these changes can be reversed with minor costs if the trial program is proven to be not successful. If the initiative is shown to be successful, the partial road markings will be extended across the remainder of the intersection and redone using more permanent paint markings.


The safety and convenience of pedestrians is an important priority for the City of Duncan. For this reason, the primary purpose in changing the traffic signaling in the Canada / Ingram intersection from a traditional crossing to a scramble crossing is to increase pedestrian safety when crossing the intersection.




Unsure how a Pedestrian Scramble Crossing is supposed to work? Check out these short videos from other city's explaining how to properly use a Pedestrian Scramble Crossing. While some elements may be different between the example videos and the Canada Ave / Ingram St crossing (ie signalized bike lanes) the premise is the same: during the pedestrian scramble phase all vehicles, including those making right turns, must stop while pedestrians are crossing the intersection.

City of Victoria

City of Edmonton

City of Sunnyvale




Cities of all shapes and sizes have Pedestrian Scramble Crossings, you do not need to be the size of Victoria or Vancouver to have one. Below are some examples of smaller Canadian cities that have installed Pedestrian Scramble Crossings. If you have experienced Pedestrian Scramble Crossings in other smaller cities (Canadian, or international) let us know so we can add them to the list!

Paris, Ontario (Pop. 14,956)

Banff, Alberta (Pop. 8,305)




Take the short (4 question) survey below and give us your feedback - Have you had a chance to use the Pedestrian Scramble Crossing? Have you found it's working well to improve pedestrian safety?

The input you provide will be shared with Council to determine if any changes are needed to the trial pedestrian scramble crossing project before it is finalized.

You can view technical drawings of the proposed changes to the intersection by clicking on the links under Documents (to the right). Staff reports, and other supporting material will be included at a later date.

To stay informed and receive project updates, click "Subscribe" on this page.

Council and Staff are currently exploring other alternatives to the Scramble Crossing at the Canada Avenue and Ingram Street. This page will be updated if/when an alternate option is approved.




The City of Duncan is implementing a trial Pedestrian Scramble Crossing at the intersection of Canada Avenue and Ingram Street. A Pedestrian Scramble Crossing, also known as a Diagonal Crossing or X-Crossing, is a type of traffic signal movement that temporarily stops all vehicle traffic, from all directions, allowing pedestrians to cross an intersection in every direction, including diagonally, during a dedicated phase that is for pedestrians only. This initiative is being taken to increase pedestrian safety at the Canada / Ingram intersection.


The Canada / Ingram Pedestrian Scramble Crossing project will begin as a trial program to determine the viability and community reaction to the project. The trial will see partial road markings installed in the intersection and slight adjustments to the signal timings to accommodate the all-directions pedestrian crossings. All of these changes can be reversed with minor costs if the trial program is proven to be not successful. If the initiative is shown to be successful, the partial road markings will be extended across the remainder of the intersection and redone using more permanent paint markings.


The safety and convenience of pedestrians is an important priority for the City of Duncan. For this reason, the primary purpose in changing the traffic signaling in the Canada / Ingram intersection from a traditional crossing to a scramble crossing is to increase pedestrian safety when crossing the intersection.




Unsure how a Pedestrian Scramble Crossing is supposed to work? Check out these short videos from other city's explaining how to properly use a Pedestrian Scramble Crossing. While some elements may be different between the example videos and the Canada Ave / Ingram St crossing (ie signalized bike lanes) the premise is the same: during the pedestrian scramble phase all vehicles, including those making right turns, must stop while pedestrians are crossing the intersection.

City of Victoria

City of Edmonton

City of Sunnyvale




Cities of all shapes and sizes have Pedestrian Scramble Crossings, you do not need to be the size of Victoria or Vancouver to have one. Below are some examples of smaller Canadian cities that have installed Pedestrian Scramble Crossings. If you have experienced Pedestrian Scramble Crossings in other smaller cities (Canadian, or international) let us know so we can add them to the list!

Paris, Ontario (Pop. 14,956)

Banff, Alberta (Pop. 8,305)




Take the short (4 question) survey below and give us your feedback - Have you had a chance to use the Pedestrian Scramble Crossing? Have you found it's working well to improve pedestrian safety?

The input you provide will be shared with Council to determine if any changes are needed to the trial pedestrian scramble crossing project before it is finalized.

You can view technical drawings of the proposed changes to the intersection by clicking on the links under Documents (to the right). Staff reports, and other supporting material will be included at a later date.

To stay informed and receive project updates, click "Subscribe" on this page.

  • The Pedestrian Scramble Crossing trial at Canada Avenue and Ingram Street has started.  Have you found the changes have made crossing safer as a pedestrian, do you enjoy being able to cross diagonally instead of waiting?  Let the City know what you think and whether the scramble should stay, or if we should return things back to normal.

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Page last updated: 12 Apr 2024, 08:06 AM